Caribbean Equality Project Exhibition Salutes LGBTQ Immigrants

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The Caribbean Equality Project’s “Live Pridefully: Love and Resilience Within Pandemics” display at the Queens Museum.
Adrian Childress

In an exhibition at the Queens Museum, the Caribbean Equality Project highlighted the experiences of undocumented Black and Brown Caribbean LGBTQ immigrants and asylum seekers.

The Caribbean Equality Project’s exhibition, called “Live Pridefully: Love and Resilience Within Pandemics,” was showcased at the museum during an event on February 19. There were readings of writer Rajiv Mohabir as well as a panel discussion with activists Qween Jean, Rohan Zhou-Lee, Darren J. Glenn, Tannuja Rozario, Theo Brown, and Tiffany Jade Munroe. There were also cultural dance performances.

The “Live Pridefully: Love and Resilience Within Pandemics” exhibit, which was curated by Caribbean Equality Project founder and executive director Mohamed Q. Amin, examines Caribbean resilience in the context of racial justice and further touches on themes of Pride, migration, pandemics, and coming out. The project employs an intersectional approach, touching on immigration rights, gender diversity, trans rights, xenophobia, gender-based violence, and misogyny in the US and Caribbean.

“Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, queer and trans immigrants of color have lived in a constant state of fear and isolation, from food insecurity, a lack of access to equitable healthcare, and rising rates of anti-Asian violence and police brutality against Black bodies,” Amin said in a written statement. “In a year of uncertainty, Live Pridefully reimagines and affirms undocumented Black and Brown Caribbean LGBTQ+ immigrants and asylum seekers as essential workers, creatives, and contributors to the cultural diversity of New York City.”

Below are some visuals of the exhibition:

Adrian Childress
Adrian Childress
Adrian Childress
Adrian Childress
Adrian Childress
Adrian Childress
Adrian Childress

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